Health benefits of Chinese bayberry

HEALTH BENEFITS OF MYRICA RUBRA

MYRICA RUBRA

Chinese Bayberry (Myrica rubra) is a subtropical evergreen tree originating in China [1], where it has been cultivated and consumed for more than 7,000 years, becoming part of Chinese traditional medicine as part of herbal remedies for some ailments and illnesses. It is primarily cultivated in southern China for several thousand years [1], in high altitude lands and mountains, having a total annual production of over 1.1 million tons. The best known cultivars are Biqi and Dongkui, both from the Zhejiang province [1]. There are four species within the genus Myrica in China, namely Myrica rubra, esculenta, nana and adenophora.

Due to its delicious taste and the amount of health benefits exerted by Chinese bayberry, the areas in which it is cultivated has considerably extended in the last year, becoming considerably bigger in China and being introduced also in Australia [1]. Image: Yumberry berries by Carsten Ullrich under Creative Commons License (CC BY-SA 2.0). 


MYRICA RUBRA

Family: Myricaceae

Genus: Myrica

Common name: Chinese Bayberry, Japanese Bayberry, Red Bayberry, Yumberry, Waxberry, or Chinese strawberry tree [9]


 

Propolis, Echinacea and Ficus carica, traditional treatements for warts

NATURAL REMEDIES FOR WARTS

ECHINACEA

Warts are caused by a viral infection, the human papillomavirus. They appear mostly as a sign of a weak immune system and thus tell us we shall take care with our health and try to boost our immune system on a natural way. Among the most commonly used herbal treatments for this viral infection we found some that didn't surprise anyone, propolis, Echinacea and Ficus carica or common fig fruit. Image: Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) by Jordan Meeter under CC license (CC BY 2.0)


ECHINACEA PURPUREA

Family: Asteraceae

Genus: Echinacea

Common name: Eastern purple coneflower, Purple coneflower.


 

Bombax ceiba, the cotton tree

COTTON TREE, A SOURCE OF PHYTOCHEMICALS

BOMBAX CEIBA

Bombax ceiba (Cotton tree) is a tree from the Malvaceae family that grows in Malay, Indonesia, China, Hong Kong and Taiwan [28]. It is covered with thorns and it's known by Tibetans as "salmari" [27], but most commonly known in Europe and America as cotton tree or tree cotton [28]. Its red flowers have five petals and were commonly used as herbal tea in China. The name Cotton tree derives from the cotton-like fiber that covers the Cotton tree seeds and that were also used in the past as a cotton substitute.

Bombax ceiba has risen the interest of scientists and researchers since some of the active constituents and phytochemicals found on this plant are known to exert many beneficial effects.


BOMBAX CEIBA

Family: Malvaceae

Genus: Bombax

Common name: Cotton tree, tree cotton, Bombax malabaricum, Salmalia malabarica


Coffee may reduce diabetes by 25%, study says

TYPE 2 DIABETES AND COFFEE

COFFEE

To the already reported benefits of coffee, namely on some neurological (infant hyperactivity, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases), metabolic disorders (diabetes mellitus, gallstones, liver cirrhosis), and gonadal and liver function properties [11] we will have to add a new property, its capability to considerably lower the incidence of type 2 diabetes, or at least that's what it has been announced in a report published by the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC).

Reports published on the subject suggest that every additional cup of coffee up to 6-8 cups /day (regular or decaffeinated) is associated with a 5-10% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes [10]. Rich in antioxidants and nutrients, coffee has generally been associated with a healthy profile in consumers [11], but pay attention, depending on the quantities consumed, coffee consumption can affect the intake of some minerals (K, Mg, Mn, Cr), niacin and antioxidant substances [12], something to be considered if we are hooked to it. Image: See credits under ref. [14] below.


COFFEA ARABICA

Family: Rubiaceae

Genus: Coffea

Common name: Coffee


 

Is cacao a memory enhancer?

HEALTH BENEFITS OF CACAO

CACAO

There are many compounds and active constituents which actions and effects on memory, among others, is still not very well known or understood. For example, a significant improvement in cognitive functions and an enhanced working memory was reported on women receiving Ginger (Zingiber officinale) extract. It seems that oxidative stress plays a very important role on stress-induced cognitive impairment, something that apparently can be reduced by certain plants as Ginger (Zingiber officinale).

But Ginger is not the only plant that plays a role in what refers to the enhancement of cognitive functions, and more precisely memory. A study performed by Lee Fruson [6], an undergraduate student at the University of Calgary, shows how other dietary factors, namely the intake of dietary flavonoids, may also affect memory and cognition.

Lee Fruson, Sarah Dalesman and Ken Lukowiak, authors of the study published in the Journal of Experimental Biology, focused on a particular type of flavonoids, the epicatechin (epi), found in cocoa, green tea and red wine, all those ones known to exert already many other beneficial properties in our bodies.  Image: Herbcyclopedia.


THEOBROMA CACAO

Family: Malvaceae

Genus: Theobroma

Common name: Cacao, cocoa